My First Blogging Mistake

The ultimate question for many of us is “Should I blog?” I’m heading limping through my third year of blogging, and I have lost count how many times I have wrestled with this question, or a modification of it.

I opted to blog on a whim. Actually, I think I’d been drinking.

I’d heard that blogging is a must-do for any writer who plans to publish, be it traditionally or independently. Even though I have my moments of wavering confidence, I have always wanted to be an author. As I was wrapping up what I thought was the final draft to Ms. Bossy, blogging sounded like the right thing to do next. So, I created this site and the blogging began.

And, wow! Did I find a treasure trove of information! Everything a writer needs to know about the craft is available online — writing, editing, publishing, blogging, platform — it’s all there for the taking.

Maybe it’s because I’m a self-proclaimed modish gladiator and I’m used to being swamped, or maybe it’s because I have trouble making decisions, or maybe it’s because I felt like a kid in a candy store — but everything looked so wonderful, so appropriate, so necessary. I dove right in.

I followed every site that had even just one fairly good article. I followed bloggers without really knowing enough about what they were all about. When random bloggers followed me, I followed back, thinking that was good blogging manners.

In no time at all, I was drowning in the Great Blogging Sea. There was too much info out there. Too many amazing bloggers. Too many sites with great advice. Too many disreputable sites. Too many bloggers who are in it just to make sales. Too much info that didn’t really apply to me.

I should have tested the waters first before setting sail on my blogging ship.

I think I was afraid of wasting time, as I was feeling like I’d already wasted too much time getting to this place on my career path. I must have thought that if I didn’t bookmark and follow sites right away, that I’d lose track of them forever and miss out on that one gem I needed to get published.

If I’d lurked around websites and blogs, before starting my blog, I would have learned a lot about the pros and cons, dos and don’ts, the good, the bad, and the ugly.

Yeah, I wouldn’t have gotten sucked into the blogging whirlpool if I’d been a lurker first.

I would have realized how much time blogging takes, which would have enabled me to come up with a time-management strategy. I would have discovered which bloggers are worth the effort and which ones are junk, and followed more prudently. I would have seen that not all sites and blogs are created equally, and not all make a difference to me.

I’d have realized that building a platform and learning the industry takes as much time and patience as writing a novel.

I’m a writer, and I’m on an epic quest. And now I know I have to treat my social-writer self as carefully and as strategically as I do my work.

What was your first blogging mistake? You have made a mistake, uh, haven’t you???

Advertisements

70 thoughts on “My First Blogging Mistake

  1. I’ve made the same mistakes as you. I think we all do. We have to find our own balance in this world that is simultaneously exciting and infuriating. However, my other big blogging mistake is being unwilling to commit to being one type of blog. I’ve suddenly found myself interacting a lot with “Mom bloggers” and with comic bloggers–with bloggers that actually making a living out of their work. I don’t feel like I fit in, because I still don’t know what my blog is or why I am building this platform. Sure, I’m now published, but does blogging help. I have now clue. My biggest mistake is no knowing how to treat this as a business–and part of me doesn’t want to.

    Like

    • Blogging is especially difficult to balance when we don’t know our platform exactly. I’ve found myself blogging more and more about wildlife conservation; that certainly wasn’t in the cards when I first started my blog. But, more time online has shown me that not everyone is aware of these issues and what better place to inform? (Not that all my readers care like I do, but that’s for another blog post. 😉 )

      I think you’re right in our hesitancy for treating blogging like a business. Being social does not readily translate to business for me, but it does for a lot of people. Those are the ones who are also great salespeople! But, I suppose if we’re here to build a platform, then we need to somehow accept the business side of it. Thanks for stopping by, Lisa!

      Liked by 1 person

      • I’m really struggling with this a lot lately. I wish our value was not based on whether or not we make any money. The more I focus on platform or marketing, the less actual creating I do. I become more blocked and scared. It’s frustrating.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Agreed. I wish we could have it the way it used to be so long ago — when authors could sit and write and produce, and someone else took care of the business/marketing side of things. I really believe the two elements don’t mix well if you’re not already a savvy salesperson.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Yes. I’ve reached the point that I can’t keep up with all the blogs in my feed now. There are just too many and only a handful of them are relevant to me. I don’t even look at my emails any more. What I do is come to my Reader and pick out the few bloggers that I actually talk to, the ones who are pleasant and good to know and chat with them. That’s far more engaging, exciting and useful to me than trying to keep up with all the blogs from my click happy days of ‘must follow everyone!’

    If there is any mistake out there that new bloggers make over and over, I think that’s the one! I’m far more conservative about my follows now. There is precious little time in the world for all the things I want to do…I need to use it wisely.

    Like

    • I haven’t tried relying on the Reader. Other bloggers have mentioned that before as helpful in keeping up with blogs. I did figure out that setting the email notifications to “weekly” vs “daily” has helped streamline them in my email feed, as they’re all delivered in one bunch one day a week. Email is where I do most of my communications, not just in writing but in life, so that’s why I haven’t tried to hard to move to the Reader.

      Like you, I have such a limited time now to blog. Recently, I had to make the hard decision to do what I can and no more than that in my allotted time. (Before, I squeezed in everyone wherever I could — it got really stressful and I wasn’t having any fun.) If it means that some blogs only get “likes” and no comments, then unfortunately that’s the way it has to be. I also find it much easier to keep up with someone who makes equal effort. Life works like that, too. 😉

      Thanks for commenting!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. The Great Blogging Sea; good one! I am often all at sea, trying to keep up with all the bloggers who interest me, as well as writing my own blog. Mistakes? Probably. But that’s simply part of the blogging experience for me.

    Like

    • In the past year I have done a lot of blog-reflection. I had reached the point of no return, basically. I knew that if I didn’t change my ways, I’d have to stop blogging altogether. Discovering where I went wrong has helped enormously in reconstructing my habits and routines. And, you’re right, mistakes are part of the growth and learning curve. I would just prefer to keep the mistakes to a minimum. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I made the same first mistake. Following everyone who had one good blog post or who followed me. It took me a few years, but I’ve finally widdled down my list to the ones I enjoy the most and have helped me the most. I’ve also branched out other than just writing ones. I’ve added other interests which have helped keep me reading.

    Like

  5. My biggest blogging mistake was not engaging the bloggers I follow, and not using Twitter in the same manner. Engagement is the most important thing a writer has to do in order to build a platform…that and submitting to magazines.

    Like

    • Hi Roger,

      I have yet to master Twitter. I’m on it, but I use it so sporadically that I feel like a fraud to say that I tweeted today. 😉 You’re absolutely right about engagement. It is the single-most important responsibility of a writer who wants readers. I can’t tell you how frustrated I get when I spend time commenting on someone’s blog, only to hear crickets. That was one of the catalysts for me to re-think my blogging commitments. Things needed to change, clearly. If I was going to invest 1-2 hours on social media every day, I wanted it to be worth my while. I’d rather build 50 meaningful friendships than get 500 followers who never read my work.

      Thanks so much for taking the time to comment!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. What a deeply insightful post! I agree with almost the full extent of your perspective. All I would add is that my blogging time (6 years later on in 2015) has been rewarded beyond belief by the wonderful circle of friends that I have made in that time.

    And it’s never too late to modify your blogging habits!

    Like

    • 6 years! Holy cats! You’re practically a lifer!

      I fully agree, Paul, about the friendships. That was the reason I chose to reconstruct my blogging habits, because I’d reached a point where I was seriously considering quitting the blog entirely. The community I found is amazing, and I’m truly lucky to have “met” so many amazing, genuine, supportive people through blogging. So, there’s something right about blogging, that’s for sure. 🙂

      Like

  7. Dear Kate,

    I got into blogging for the same reason, looking to create a social media platform, featuring posts that would be of interest to writers. That lasted about two months! It’s now much more of a general blog, in which I do more storytelling than how-to stuff. But I’ve taken such pleasure in the unexpected use of my photography, made some valued blogging buddies, learned to keep my writing concise, had lots of practice creating titles, etc. and when the time comes, agents and publishers will see that I have created a respectable body of work with a respectable following of readers.

    I have also learned that my family and real life and my manuscript must come first, and I’m not driven by stats. I post when I have something to say, two or three times a month, or maybe even four, if I’m inspired, instead of the recommended two or three times a week. I wouldn’t consider it a blogging mistake so much as the evolution of an endeavor to suit one’s needs and/or purposes.

    Thanks for another thoughtful post. It was a helpful to look back at where I’ve come from and where I’m going.

    Like

    • Hey Naomi,

      Yes, in the past year my blog has become a combination of writing advice and wildlife conservation awareness. My original theme was how to balance writing and life, but there’s only so much you can say about that without repeating yourself. So, that’s why I branched out, but I’m happy with the increased options that I have for posts. Before, I felt limited and stifled.

      I’m also not driven by stats, so that is a blessing. Sometimes, I think I should worry about my stats, but then I remember I’m a working mom for Pete’s sake! Stats can wait. But blogging interfered with my novels as I spent my writing time working on blog posts.

      I used to post multiple times a week, but that’s also when I was fresh and had plenty of things to say. 3 years later, much of what I have to say is repetitive or feels like old news to me, even if I haven’t posted about it. I figured I was getting tired of the act of blogging, and that’s why nothing sounded good to post.

      But, it’s all good because I’ve learned a lot, not just about blogging but about myself too. I think these lessons will help me as I trudge onward. 🙂

      Thanks for taking the time to comment, Naomi!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Great thoughts, Kate. I feel like you at times, and like some of the other commenters that haven’t quite figured out my blogging platform. I’ve eased up on myself and still like blogging. The one thing that blogging has helped me with is finding other writers that have helped me grow as an author. For that alone, I guess the rough seas of blogging have been worth crashing through.

    Like

    • My platform is changing, I think. I’ve added on wildlife conservation awareness, for one. Although, not so sure how that will help with my brand! But, I’m okay with it because I’m much happier knowing I can post about that when I don’t feel like giving out writing advice. I also agree with you about the benefit of blogging buddies. I wouldn’t have stuck around this long if it weren’t for this amazing community (you’re included, of course). I’ve learned more from all of you than from any writing guide. No joke.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. I hear ya, honey! Think we all took the plunge just like you did, and honestly, I think that’s the only way to really know the blogging world. You have to jump right in.

    Over the last year, I’ve worked on scaling my blog reading time WAY back. I have a small group that I keep up with and I don’t spend as much time finding new blogs and keeping up with everybody. I feel like it has affected my traffic to some extent, but it’s more important for me to spend my time wisely.

    Like

    • Maybe you’re right — maybe I didn’t make a mistake. But, I do think there is a way to get our feet wet in the Great Blogging Sea without drowning first. 🙂 I get overwhelmed with new information fast, so jumping into things is actually not a great strategy for me. If it weren’t for the great community I found, I would have bailed long ago.

      I’ve scaled back a lot too, and yup, it affected traffic. I wondered if that was a smart move, considering I’m trying to build that pesky platform, but like you say — it’s more important to spend my time wisely. What good is a platform without a book to sell?

      Liked by 1 person

  10. “And now I know I have to treat my social-writer self as carefully and as strategically as I do my work.”—I think that’s a great point. We all flounder a bit when we start, but we have to find what works for us, otherwise we could be on the blogosphere endlessly and get nothing else done. As much as I enjoy my social media time, I also consider it my work time, if that makes sense. Social media engagement is one of the many jobs writers do. The days of simply putting all one’s alotted time into writing and doing nothing else are gone. There’s social media, marketing, book publishing (if one is self-published), etc. that also need to be worked in. Unless one is Stephen King or JK Rowling, I suppose, but even then, I bet they do far more than we realize in terms of non-writing.

    Like

    • You totally make sense — social media time is work time for me, too. It has to be. I’m certainly not blogging because I have nothing better to do. Luckily, for the most part, I truly enjoy blogging, and it’s because of the community I found. But, that enjoyment has to have its limits, and I’m constantly fiddling with the time I spend here.

      For me, my fits and starts are dependent on after-school activities, sports schedules, holidays, family demands. There is no constant, no regular schedule I can make. I either feel I’m not here enough or I’m here too much!

      Scaling back on the number of sites and blogs I follow has helped enormously. I felt guilty ditching some people, but if the connection wasn’t growing or impacting me in a positive way, then that was reason enough to move on. Now, when I choose to follow someone, I make my decision based on experience and certain expectations. It’s made a huge difference.

      Like

      • I’ve evolved to that point too. As much as I’d like to follow everyone back, I can’t. But for those who keep visiting my site, I’ll always give them a follow. As others have said, it’s the interaction that makes blogging so meaningful.

        Like

  11. You summed up my early blogging experience/exposure perfectly! I too started drowning in the Great Blogging sea and still find myself going under occasionally! It takes So. Much. Time. As with all things in life we must find balance. It is easy to get off kilter to the detriment of other things, like finishing a manuscript!

    Like

    • Finishing a manuscript is kinda important, seeing as how said manuscript is the reason we’re blogging in the first place! I wish I’d known how intensive and overwhelming social media is before I dove in. For another instance, I wish I hadn’t jumped into Twitter, FB, and Linkedin so soon after blogging. My attention is too divided. Rather than putting forth meaningful effort in 1 or 2 venues, I’m scattered all over the place. Not very professional!

      Like

  12. Your quest sounds eerily familiar. I’ve taken a huge step back over the past several months and finally am beginning to move forward again. Much slower and more deliberate.
    BTW: it’s chicken and garlic pizza tonight!!!

    Like

    • I noticed your absence, and I’ve missed you. But, I completely understand the need for scaling back. I know I want to blog. I enjoy it more than tweeting or facing. 😉 But, it is hard to keep it under control.

      I heard slow and deliberate wins the race, so maybe you’re on to something!

      Save me some pizza!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. I, probably, follow more blogs than I should. I have 342 actual followers, then there’s Facebook, and wherever else WordPress and the blogging world considers they come from.
    Obviously, I don’t get 342+ comments on every post (or any post), nor do I get 342+ views on every post (did do that on 1). This tells me, smart math guy that I am, that not everyone reads every one of my posts and/or comments on it. I do the same with the ones I follow. Yes, I get over 300 emails a day that I have to choose from and, yes, I do read some of the posts. I, normally, use the person and/or the title of the post to choose from.
    Still, perhaps, it will come down to a mistake. My first? Hardly.
    Great post,
    Scott

    Like

    • Scott, your point about the number of comments you get versus the number of followers you have was one of the compelling reasons I changed my ways. Supposedly, I have several hundred followers. Hello-o? Where are they? Maybe they really are reading everything, but simply not commenting. But, how am I to know?

      I guess what it comes down to for me is that I blog not just to build a platform, but to build relationships on some level (considering we’re online, the term ‘relationship’ is loose). But, still, I’ve gotten to know a lot of people just through blogging alone. And that’s what I enjoy about blogging. There’s an element of realness to it, more so than any other social media venue I’ve tried. But, I don’t want to blog just to blog, either. There has to be an objective here, something more than building online friendships. So, I’m working through that in hopes of finding the right balance.

      Thanks for taking the time to read and comment!

      Like

      • Enjoyed the post. You can tell if they are reading everything by the number of views you get. In my case, neither is much over 10-20, so people are reading, but not everyone, not every time.

        Like

      • That’s probably the case for most of us. Not all my followers read all my posts, and many followers only comment on posts of a certain category. For instance, this post on blogging received more views/comments than my post on the wildlife trafficking enforcement act. So, by that, I can assume what subject material most interest my followers. But, there are so many more facets to this that can’t be accounted for and we’re truly left to guessing how to make the most of our blogging time.

        Like

  14. Yes, as others have said, it’s a familiar pattern! But you kind of have to go through that to learn, and then you can streamline later once you come to understand what it’s all about and what it is you want from it. Sometimes I think that’s a good way to do things in generaly actually, dive in, immerse yourself, and then fine tune after that – if you approach something too cautiously and thoughtfully at first then maybe you never really start. So I wouldn’t call it a mistake, just a learning path!

    Like

    • You and Britt have similar perspectives. And I can see how some people have to dive in to get a true understanding of the process. My problem is that I am easily overwhelmed, and I tend to stall out when that happens. There is a lot of inaction from me when too many things are flying at me. I just kind of accept it as my lot, deal with it the best I can, until I burn out.

      I learn better in baby steps, taking things slowly, and asking questions first. That’s why I think I had to be drinking when my blog went live, because that is just so not me!

      Maybe “mistake” is too harsh and self-critical. Maybe it is another lesson down Writing Path. But, good gracious, when are the lessons going to end?!? 😉

      Like

  15. You are so right – we must be strategic about this. I’ve come to terms with my blogging and what it means to me and what I hope it means to the world, but I still struggle with time involved, photography, platform, and how it serves my family and of course – my writing career! We are on an epic quest (man, I love that phrase).

    Like

    • I think I’ve finally come to terms with blogging and what it means to me, too. It’s taken a while, and I’m still tweaking it here and there. Adding in posts on wildlife conservation has given me a fresh angle to work with, so helpful when I don’t feel like doling out writing advice! 🙂

      I like the direction you’ve taken your blog, Amy. I feel like you have a great handle on your platform and you know who your audience is. I enjoy your posts a lot, because they always seem to come straight from the heart.

      Epic quest indeed. Glad we’re on it together.

      Like

  16. Another example of how we are cosmic twins, Kate. 🙂 I started blogging for the same reasons, with the same (ultimately mistaken) view of where my first novel was, and the same naive strategy for posting and following. Maybe newcomers wouldn’t need to make these same mistakes if the so-called experts we look to for advice would recognize these pitfalls and offer advice to “lurk before we leap.”

    I think many of us who are serious about our novels/memoirs/creative endeavors make the same changes you have. It’s the only way we can move forward with those works. If we don’t cut back, we may never finish the projects that the blogs and other social media are meant to support.

    I hope your revised social media strategy has helped your writing momentum!

    Like

    • LOL — “Lurk before we leap.” That is too awesome! I might have to borrow that phrase someday! Judging from the comments, many people know of what I speak, which is heartening. We are not in this alone, and to know how many of us have all gone about blogging in the same way makes me feel better.

      Blogging has had its benefits, no doubt. But, I think we all need to take it a bit less seriously at the start. I’d probably tell a newbie blogger, just do it for fun, and don’t put it ahead of anything, for about a year. See where it takes you. If you like the results, amp up your effort. But, in all honesty, if your book isn’t solidly written, no amount of blog followers will convince an agent to take a risk on you.

      Of course, that is a simplistic way to look at it and there are tons of other details people need to consider. As long as we put our books ahead of the blogging, we’re doing okay.

      Like

  17. Yes, exactly what you and so many others here have said. I try to budget a certain amount of time to blog and read blogs. It’s far less than when I first started. But I don’t want to die before I achieve my writing goals.

    Like

    • Haha–you said it perfectly! And blogs are certainly capable of sending us over the edge. I have learned that quality is more important than quantity, and that many posts go to waste when we overdo it. The one benefit to spending so much time on here is that we can find a community we feel comfortable with rather quickly. Once we can do that, I think it’s much easier to be objective about how we spend our time on social media.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. I started out as a lurker and that didn’t help me much – I still ended up getting sucked in. It’s easy to get sucked in when there are so many great blogs out there and I’d rather lurk around and comment than post. But there are times when work is insane and there’s not enough time or energy to visit everyone. I have to keep telling myself not to feel guilty about it, but I still do. The biggest mistake is putting the blog before the novel and I’ve done that too often. So mine is also limping along, but then when we don’t post often it’s easier to try to keep up with it all. 🙂

    Like

    • I’m interested to know that lurking didn’t help you much. That makes me feel a bit better about having jumped into it without knowing a single thing. Maybe I wouldn’t have learned anything by lurking? Who knows.

      Blogging over noveling is probably my second biggest mistake. Way too easy to be distracted by you people! 🙂

      Like

  19. Following everyone that followed me. I started to get anxiety about not keeping up with blog reading. As if that was where I should be allocating more and more of my time. I had to realize that I can’t be everywhere. Instead, I focus on the blogs that comment on mine. And I’ve made blog reading a once a week task. 🙂

    Like

    • There is a lot of pressure to follow people who follow me — I felt like I “owed” it to them to follow back. But, most of those early followers are nowhere to be seen today. I agree, when someone regularly comments, I will start following and commenting on their blog too. But if it’s just a follow? No. What’s the point? I want to make connections here, it’s not all about buying someone’s book or CD. Once a week — yep — me too, although it’s hard to contain to just once a week!

      Like

      • Exactly. When someone takes the time to read and comment, I want to reciprocate. And then we get to know each other and build a relationship and I visit their blog because I want to know what they are up to. I try to reciprocate follows, but I can’t possibly read that many blogs. So glad we met in the blogosphere. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  20. I too did the mistake of following every blogger who follows me, but I quickly found I couldn’t keep up. So I trimmed down my list and only stuck to the ones I really like and make a point of checking out at random times. 🙂

    Like

    • Couldn’t keep up indeed! Especially with those who post more than once a week. I also started taking my cue from those who comment regularly on my blog, which isn’t many compared to how many followers I have. I figure if someone is going to take the time to read and comment, then I will do the same in return. It has been a lot easier to stay on top of everything!

      Like

  21. I was like you Kate, started blogging because it was what writers should do but without knowing much about how it worked. Over two years on, I still struggle to find a balance in terms of the time it takes to keep up with others, but the compensations of finding a writing community have been awesome.

    Like

    • I heard that writers must blog, must have a platform. But darned if I could figure out a workable strategy. Everyone finds his own blogging routine, and it isn’t going to work for everybody else. That’s probably why we end up diving in and making a hundred mistakes before we know what we’re doing.

      You’re right about the community. It’s worth every minute I struggled. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  22. Insightful post Kate and I got a lot out of the above comments too. I so much resonate with all of what’s been said, although oddly enough I very quickly came to understand that by hitting the ”follow” button my e-mail box would be inundated so I never made that mistake. I know myself well enough that my sensitive mind couldn’t handle that. Sometimes, I still feel a bit shameful and uncomfortable about it since I did/do get notifications whenever people start to follow me and I don’t follow back. What I do instead is bookmarking or subscribing through the RSS feeds and I check them out whenever I feel like. There now.. it’s out there, that’s the reason 😀 !! So sorry. It’s not easy to build a readers platform like that and I guess that might be one of the reasons why I’m not having a lot of traffic on my site, but I really need to learn how to take better care of myself and my precious time here on earth and that’s just the way it’s gonna be. I would go crazy otherwise 🙂

    Like

  23. Bookmarking sounds like a really good idea, Karin. I did try the RSS feeds for a bit, but I noticed that not every blogger offers that as a follow option. I like having all of my blog notifications in one place, because my mind compartmentalizes or categorizes things in that fashion. However, I don’t reckon anyone can follow over 200 blogs on a weekly basis and be good conversationalists on each one! So, I had to cut back based on which bloggers really speak to me.

    Don’t apologize for your methods, Karin, especially if you’re doing it because you want to nurture yourself. I think you’re wise to know what works best for you. Blogging is a hard animal to train, and I’d be surprised if anyone found a foolproof method.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Oh yeah. I can relate. I seem to suffer from hobby-hopping. Although writing is still my primary goal and everything I do seems to be centred around it. At the moment my blogging has taken a bit of a back seat because I’m focussing more on photography. And that started a while back when I realised I was getting closer to finishing one of my novels and would soon need a cover, which I intend to design myself, photography and all. I know, breaking all the rules (You MUST have a professionally designed cover) but who cares. It’s the experience I want. And I guarantee it won’t look like the product of MS Paint! Another reason is that I have a few blog-series prepared but I’m a little hesitant to hit the publish button on them! I might create enemies or draw too much attention. In fact if there aren’t enough mistakes on my blog, these series could be the biggest ones!

    I had a lecturer at uni in 1990, who once said when a student questioned him, “Are you suggesting I’ve made a mistake? I haven’t made a mistake since 1972”. To this day no one is sure if he was joking or not. Then again we haven’t discussed it for the better part of 25 years!

    Like

    • Hey Richard,

      I think you’re smart to get into photography and even try to do your own cover. Seems like writers have to be in charge of most aspects of their publishing path, why not cover design too!

      I want to get to a point where my blogging enhances my creative writing/freelancing. I don’t want it to get in the way anymore. I’m in a good groove now, and I really am enjoying my time spent blogging. I plan to keep it that way!

      Like

Give me your thoughts. Or your pizza. I'm not picky.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s