Writer…Uninterrupted Goes Indie

Writer…Uninterrupted is a series of handbooks for those who want to make writing an integral part of their lives. The books started out as posts right here on my blog. In the beginning, I had no intention of turning the posts into something meatier. But, over time, I found that I had more help and guidance to give than what is digestible in an average-length blog post.

Early on in my dream to be a writer, I had oodles of story ideas, and followed up on them from beginning to end, filling dozens of notebooks. While I longed to see my stories in print, I failed to research the process from writing to publishing. As if I believed my stories would simply sprout wings, fly to a publisher’s desk, and be in bookstores within days.

 

When my fairy- and unicorn-filled path turned stormy and treacherous, I lost my drive. I still loved writing, but with the process losing me in its turbulence, I was pretty scattered for a long time.

Then a friend asked me to help her with her short story. I so thoroughly enjoyed working with her and jib-jabbing about the writing gig, that I knew I’d found one of my true purposes in life.

To help other writers.

Giving back to other writers quickly became a major writing goal. And it was partly due to this motivation that I leaped back into my writer’s saddle and attacked that perilous slope called Writing.

Basically, I had to start my writing dream over from scratch. Some of my new ventures included my freelance writing coach business, after-school writing enrichment programs for kids, and blogging.

Writer…Uninterrupted is a spin-off of everything I’ve experienced, a resource to help other writers as they embark on their journey or to become unfuddled. I look forward to sharing the series with you upon the release of the first book later this month.

 

 

If you could start your writing dream over, what change would you make?

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38 thoughts on “Writer…Uninterrupted Goes Indie

  1. Kate, I can’t wait to read these books! You’ve already helped me become a better writer through your blog posts and your critiques of my manuscripts. Having this series on my Kindle will be the frosting on the cake!

    Boy, such a simple-sounding question you have at the end of this post, but I’m not finding it easy to come up with a simple answer…. My first thought is that I wish I knew more about how difficult the journey is and how good (or not so good) my writing was at the time. But then, if I had known, maybe I would never have tried. And writing those first two manuscripts was a lot of fun. The rewrites, not so much. 😉 So I’m stuck on an answer, but I’m curious what other commenters will say.

    Congratulations on this series, and you know I’ll help spread the word!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks JM! Your support means the world to me. I think it is a tough question — if we choose a “do-over” then what do we miss out on as a result? I have grown to be a big believer in ‘experience making us who we are’ and that there are no wrong choices, just life-shaping choices.

      I know what you mean by the rewrites. And yet, I think about how many writers abandon their stories even before they can say they wrote a second draft. So, you’ve tackled a lot on your journey. 🙂

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  2. I’m not sure what I’d change. Maybe I’d work on having more books written before I sought publication for the first one. But I suppose everything’s easier in hindsight.
    Looking forward to your series!

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  3. I very much look forward to your book, Kate. I’ve enjoyed your lovely and heart-felt writing on this blog and can imagine how rich and helpful the book will be.

    As for if I were to start over again, I’d start sooner and stick with it and not worry about publication as much as improving my skills and craft. I wouldn’t worry as much about finding time amid the day job but just write, if even only an hour a day. That’s what I’m doing now.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Jagoda! That’s a lovely compliment.

      Yes, I fully agree with your choice for what you’d do if you started over. The goal of publication has a way of scrambling our brains, making us forget why we wanted to get published in the first place. I’m glad you’re just writing now. That’s really half the battle.

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  4. I’m really excited for this, Kate, and I hope your books inspire more people as you’ve done for me! Have you given any thought to putting these e-books into print form, as well, at any point in the future?

    Hm. I think if I were to change anything about my writing, it would be to accept myself earlier. For a long time, I was shamed into thinking I shouldn’t write the stories that came with my true voice, that I’d be ostracized for it. I’ve come to understand a bit late that popularity isn’t as important to me as writing the stories I want to write. I guess I’d like to go back and tell younger-me that it’s okay to write for the fringe, or even for just myself. Readers and editors can help a writer fashion a story for sale, but the story needs to come from a place of unshackled honesty.

    All the best for your e-books! ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hey Mayumi,
      Writers have to write for themselves first and foremost, so I fully agree with you. Unfortunately, there is a lot of pressure out there to share our work and if we do it too early or we’re not ready for honest feedback, it can lead to devastating results.

      I have thought about offering a print form in the future. But I don’t want to bite off more than I can chew, so I figured I’d ease myself toward that goal.

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      • Kate,
        I don’t think I have any choice but to share. A traditional publisher is never going to publish my stuff. I’m trying to finish and when I do I’m going to make a print version and an e-book which will sell on Amazon. I have a free e-book on amazon of part 1 of my book (with a cliff hanger), but I think I should resolve all the loose ends and save or destroy the world — I haven’t decided which.

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    • Mayumi, I’m not sure about “unshackled honesty”. I have to lie. That’s why I’m trying fiction. I can’t write about myself: there’s nothing there. I can write about a hero but I’m not and I have no experience being one. Perhaps in a story I could be rescued, but certainly not in real life. I could travel in a novel but certainly not in real life. I think a story needs to come from a place of profound dishonesty. And the voice of various characters can’t be my voice if it’s going to succeed.

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  5. Kate: congratulations on turning an idea into a process into a product. I’ve followed your blog for a while now and I know your books will have some meat to them. The entire writing community will thank you…
    Jack Remick

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Jack! I enjoyed expanding on the posts and offering more of what I’ve learned and experienced. I know that a lot of people sneer at ‘writing guides’ but I think it’s all in the approach the reader takes. If a reader thinks he’s going to learn how to write simply by reading a guide, then he’s doomed before he even starts. But if anyone writes a bestseller after reading my series, then I’m happy to take part of the credit. 😉

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  6. I’m excited for you and your e-books! Sometimes I think I should have gotten a master’s degree in writing because the learning process would have been much quicker, but then I might not have turned to reporting. I pushed fiction writing aside in favor of getting paid for writing and now I regret not treating fiction as a real job all along – because that’s really all I ever wanted to do.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hey Sheila,

      It’s so hard when we have to make a living and that means our fiction writing can’t come first — immediately. I think you were really smart to get into journalism though. That’s one of my regrets — not trying to do another form of writing that pays while I learn how to write fiction properly. I realize now that any kind of writing would have helped me get better with fiction. And I’m sure your experience with reporting has had a helping hand for your fiction. 🙂

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  7. I’m looking forward to your series! I find it hard to juggle the writing I have to do for work and the writing I want to do for myself so in a way I wish I had learned to carve more time for the personal writing. But that skill is learned over time, right?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Letizia,

      I think carving-time-to-write is a skill we learn through doing, yes. And I have learned that the best way to do that is to treat my time to write like I would getting to my paying job on time. We usually can’t get away with being late to work or missing work (or we’d get fired), so I think we have to look at our time to write with the same sense of responsibility. But for that to happen, a writer has to really, really want to write in the first place.

      I also think it’s harder for those who also write for work. That’s a heck of a lot of writing! You must face days or nights where you just don’t feel like writing because you’re burned out. I think that would be a tough situation.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Prioritizing time is key, I agree. I’ve been setting aside 20 min each day and that’s been working even if that seems like little time it starts to accumulate!

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  8. Pingback: Friend Focus: 4amWriter’s Writer…Uninterrupted Goes Indie | Even More BonusParts!

  9. Congratulations Kate, one of your dreams getting closer! When I thought about your question, my first thought was to take myself seriously sooner, but then I know that some of the experiences I’ve had in life are what’s made me the writer I am today, so I’m not sure I’d change anything!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Andrea,

      I love hearing that some writers wouldn’t change anything, despite the rough road they’d traveled. I agree that our experiences make us who we are, and we shouldn’t regret anything. It’s hard, though, when you finally reach a point of self-acceptance and you wonder, what the heck took me so long?

      Liked by 1 person

  10. These sound great Kate, I’m sure they will be excellent, I look forward to reading! Congratulations for doing this 🙂 I think my answer to the question is that I haven’t really started my writing dream, I think I’ve mentioned before that I feel like I’ve only ever dabbled, little bits here and there, never properly committing, well apart from my blog but I don’t count that as part of my writing dream…I don’t think…I don’t know anymore!

    Liked by 1 person

    • You sound very conflicted! 🙂 No, I know exactly what you mean, Vanessa. I used to get irritated with my choice to blog because I discovered it took up a lot of my creative writing time. Then I realized that I needed this outlet. It has helped me to talk more openly about my writing, which in turn has made me want to write more. I think dabbling is good, and you’ll know when you’re ready to commit to something else. Just don’t you dare stop blogging! 🙂

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  11. Coolio, Kate! Looking forward to reading your insight. If I could start over, I would have chosen this path earlier, much earlier, instead of taking a pragmatic approach and becoming an engineer. In some ways those years were lost, in other ways, they’ve enriched my life. So while I’d be much further along my career path as a writer, I would have missed so much else. So maybe, I took the right path for me. Who knows? I DO KNOW that the path I’m on right now is the right one. I’m at Highlights Summer Camp this week. The program starts tonight, and I can’t believe how lucky I am to be here and learning more about this thing we call writing. And I am putting concentrated time to get the writing and revising done. Must be on fast forward to accomplish all my goals and then some. Cheers!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Highlights Summer Camp sounds awesome. I’m guessing that’s the Highlights children’s magazine? I think that you’re probably right when you talk about being on the right path even though it meant you had to make some sacrifices. I think most of us can relate to that. I never fail to be amazed at these young kids who seem to know exactly what they want before they even finish their schooling. I’m like, how do you know that is what you truly want to do, until you try it first??? So much more self-confidence than I ever had.

      Good luck on your writing and revising mission!

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Congrats, Kate! Looking forward to seeing your journey continue to unfold–and wishing you all the best!! If I started over, I think I would change my attitude. I’m trying to adopt a more peaceful mindset, one that is more about creativity and discovery, rather than my insane this is what is “supposed to” happen mindset. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Attitude is everything, as “they” say! I think it’s hard to not think about what is “supposed to” happen, because of goal-setting. Without goals, we have a much more difficult time moving forward. Yet, those goals can undo us if we aren’t careful — exactly as you’re saying. Somehow, we have to bring in that acceptance, so that we can go after our goals without losing our minds! Suuurre!

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  13. Yay!!! So freaking exciting, Kate!

    I don’t think I would wish for my writing journey to be any different. I went into the whole thing, naive as all get-out just like most starry-eyed writers. I’ve been scared, I’ve been happy, I’ve been hopeful, and I’ve been ready to throw in the towel. Nothing else in the world makes me feel that way. The endless challenge and the tireless passion is why we do what we do.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Beautifully said, Britt. I think that’s where a lot of writers go wrong — they aren’t ready to deal with the disappointments or rejections or obstacles, over and over and over again. We get battered a lot, we do. But if we can get up and try again, we’re moving forward. It may not feel that way, but we are.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Looking forward to reading this book. I’ve enjoyed hearing about your writing journey here on your blog. 🙂 I agree with Coleen the “supposed to” happen mindset really can mess with your mind. It’s been hard to reach that point where I deal with what is in the moment not what should have been. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’ve been lucky to write for such a supportive and understanding audience on this blog. I feel like everyone who reads and comments have been through the wringer, just like I have, and we’re all comrades for that reason. I agree with you about the mind-messing strategy of “supposed to”. But I’m getting better at it. I have found that having a plan B in my pocket can make a big difference. 🙂

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    • Thank you, Karin. This came out of left field for me, not something I planned for a long time at all. But, one day it seemed like a good idea. So, I put it in motion. At the very least, I’ll be learning a lot about myself and the industry — important ingredients for healthy growth. 🙂

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